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50 must-see college sports stadiums

Sure, these stadiums are places to watch college football games, but they are so much more. Many of these stadiums are hallowed ground, where incredible players found glory and legendary coaches are immortalized with statues and even having the stadiums named after them. Have you been to any of these venues?

  • Michigan Stadium, University of Michigan: Also known as "the big house," this stadium, home turf of Wolverine football, seats almost 110,000 fans. One of those seats belongs to Fritz Crisler, Michigan football coach from 1938-1947. Though he died in 1982, there's a special seat reserved just for him, though nobody seems to know exactly which seat it is.
  • Beaver Stadium, Penn State: Home of Penn State's storied football team, the Nittany Lions, the stadium seats 106,572 fans, making it the fourth-largest stadium in the world. Fans enjoy several stadium traditions, including zombie nation and whiteouts.
  • Neyland Stadium, University of Tennessee, Knoxville: Named for General Neyland, Tennessee football coach 1926-1952, Neyland Stadium is college football's fourth-largest stadium in the nation. With a capacity of 102,037, the stadium was filled beyond capacity, to 109,061, in 2004 for the Tennessee/Florida game.
  • Ohio Stadium, Ohio State: Located a stone's throw from the banks of the Olentangy River, horseshoe-shaped Ohio Stadium was built in 1922. Home to the Buckeyes, the stadium is listed in the National Registry of Historic Places and has a capacity of 102,329.
  • Bryant-Denny Stadium, University of Alabama: Home to the legendary Crimson Tide football team, Bryant-Denny stadium was built in 1929 and currently seats 101,821. Record attendance was vs LSU in 2011. Several NFL players spent their college careers playing in the stadium, including hall-of-famer Joe Namath.
  • Darrell K. Royal - Texas Memorial Stadium, University of Texas: Awash in a sea of orange during home games, this stadium is the stomping grounds of the Longhorns. This is a good-luck stadium for them -- the team boasts a 77.8 percent home-win record through the 2011 season.
  • Rose Bowl, UCLA: This stadium is not only home to Bruin football, but it's the host stadium for the famous Tournament of Roses football game, played on New Year's Day. This off-campus facility is located almost 30 miles from campus.
  • Sanford Stadium, University of Georgia: Playing at this stadium, home to the ferocious Bulldog football team, is referred to as playing "between the hedges," due to the hedges that surround the field. All of Georgia's deceased bulldog mascots are entombed in the southwest corner of the stadium.
  • Tiger Stadium, Louisiana State University: Home to the Tigers football team, this stadium becomes the sixth-largest city in Louisiana during home games. Because of the noise level during games, it's widely known as one of the most difficult stadiums for a visiting team to play in.
  • Ben Hill Griffin Stadium, University of Florida: "The Swamp" is the appropriately named venue for the University of Florida Gators. Three Heisman Trophy winners have called The Swamp home, including Tim Tebow.
  • Jordan-Hare Stadium, Auburn University: The Auburn Tigers call this 72-year old stadium with a natural-grass field home. During home games, the war eagle is released as fans chant "war" and then yell "eagle!" as he lands on the field.
  • Kyle Field, Texas A&M: This venue is known as the "home of the 12th man," because the football fans support the 11 players on the field as a 12th player. The entire student body stands for the entire game in further support the Aggies on the field.
  • Gaylord Family - Oklahoma Memorial Stadium, the University of Oklahoma: The first game was played in this stadium in 1923. Fans of the OU Sooners look forward to seeing the Sooner Schooner, a horse-drawn covered wagon that is driven onto the field after every score, almost as much as the game itself.
  • Stanford Stadium, Stanford University: The home of the Stanford Cardinal underwent a major renovation in 2006. It is the largest privately owned college football facility in the U.S. President Herbert Hoover gave his acceptance speech here after being made the republican party candidate.
  • Folsom Field, University of Colorado, Boulder: Affectionately known as "the hilltop," this is where the Buffaloes football team roams at 5,350 feet above sea level. The opening and closing credits of the 1970s sitcom "Mork and Mindy" were filmed here.
  • Husky Stadium, University of Washington: Located a stone's throw away from Seattle's Lake Washington, the location makes great use of the natural beauty of the area with breathtaking views -- called "almost too pretty for football" -- and tailgating parties on the water. It's the largest stadium in the Pacific Northwest.
  • Autzen Stadium, University of Oregon: This is where the beloved Oregon Ducks strut their stuff. Fans are close to the action, which can make for some very loud games and some psyched-out opponents. For game against USC in 2007, crowd noise was recorded at 127.2 decibels, which is louder than sandblasting or a shot gun blast.
  • Hayward Field, University of Oregon: is known as the centerpiece of "Track Town USA." This historical track and field venue has hosted the NCAA outdoor championships more than any other venue in history -- a record 10 times.
  • California Memorial Stadium, UC Berkeley: The Golden Bears football team of UC Berkeley played their 2011 season at AT&T Park in San Francisco, but will roar onto the field on the newly renovated California Memorial Stadium for the 2012 season. The retrofit and renovation of the historic stadium is expected to make it one of the premiere stadiums on the West Coast.
  • Rice-Eccles Stadium, University of Utah: Located at 4,657 feet above sea level in Salt Lake City, this stadium is home to the Utah Utes football team. It was the main stadium for the 2002 Winter Olympics, with the opening and closing ceremonies taking place there.
  • Aloha Stadium, University of Hawai'i: This stadium, home of the Warriors football team, overlooks Pearl Harbor. Visitors to the stadium will find a mouth-watering array of foods available including American, Hawaiian, Japanese, Greek, Italian, Cajun, and Chinese cuisine.
  • Bobby Bowden Field at Doak Campbell Stadium, Florida State University: The Seminoles host visiting teams in this stadium named after legendary Florida football coach Bobby Bowden and a former university president. It is the largest continuous brick structure in the U.S.
  • Bronco Stadium, Boise State University: Home to the only blue Astro Turf field in the world, Bronco Stadium, affectionately known as "The Blue" is widely known for its unique color. Blue must be a lucky color -- the Broncos have only lost three home games since 1999.
  • Carrier Dome, Syracuse University: This venue does double duty for football and basketball, along with Syracuse's championship lacrosse team. It can hold 32,000 fans for basketball and 52,000 for football.
  • Faurot Field at Memorial Stadium, University of Missouri: The Mizzou Tigers call this stadium home. It was built in 1926 for the bargain price of $350,000. A giant block "M" made of painted white stones graces the berm located behind one of the end zones.
  • Jones AT&T Stadium, Texas Tech University: This stadium, known as "The Jones", houses 84 luxury suites and has a capacity of around 60,000. Home of the Red Raiders football team, the stadium saw its first game in 1947.
  • Kinnick Stadium, University of Iowa: Named after 1939 Heisman Trophy winner Nile Kinnick, this stadium underwent a major renovation in 2006. Kinnick, who died in service during World War II, is honored with a bronze statue at the stadium.
  • Lane Stadium, Virginia Tech: The school's two-story Hall of Fame museum is located on the west side of this stadium, home of the Hokies football team, and features all Hokie sports with galleries, display cases and interactive screens.
  • LaVell Edwards Stadium, BYU: BYU's massive collection of Jurassic period fossils were once stored underneath the east bleachers of this stadium, home to the Cougars football team, but have since been removed and displayed at the school's Earth Science Museum.
  • Notre Dame Stadium, University of Notre Dame: Since 1966, every Fighting Irish home game, except one on Thanksgiving Day, has been a sellout at this stadium. A mural nicknamed "Touchdown Jesus", so named because Jesus is depicted with raised arms, can be seen from the stadium.
  • Frank Howard Field at Memorial Stadium, Clemson University: Also known as Death Valley, this stadium is home to the Clemson Tigers football team and was also used by the Carolina Panthers NFL team its first season. The football team has an elaborate stadium entrance ritual, which includes "running down the hill."
  • Memorial Stadium, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: Built as a memorial in 1923 to the Illinois women and men who lost their lives serving in World War I, this stadium is home to the Fighting Illini football team. The Grange Rock, dedicated to legendary halfback Red Grange, is located at the north end of the field.
  • Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium, University of Arkansas: Razorback Stadium is mostly the home of the Razorback football team, though they play at least two games at the War Memorial Stadium in Little Rock due to contractual obligations. Fans refer to the stadium as "The Pressure Cooker".
  • Ross-Ade Stadium, Purdue University: Dedicated in 1924, this stadium is home to the Boilermaker football team. A limestone and brick tunnel at the stadium is dedicated to the memory of the 17 coaches, football players and fans who perished in a 1903 train wreck.
  • Scott Stadium, University of Virginia: It used to be tradition for men to wear coats and ties and women to wear sundresses to Cavaliers football games in this stadium, but in 2003 some fans started wearing orange t-shirts. Ties and dresses are still spotted, though -- many in orange.
  • Spartan Stadium, Michigan State University: Described as having the atmosphere of a snake pit by ESPN announcer Lee Corso, this stadium is home to the Spartans football team. Don't miss Zeke the Wonder Dog catching Frisbees during the half-time show.
  • TCF Bank Stadium, University of Minnesota: A whopping 97 percent of the 9,000 tons of steel used in the recent expansion of the stadium, home of Gophers football, comes from recycled steel. The University is the first LEED-certified collegiate football facility.
  • Sun Devil Stadium, Arizona State University: While home to the Sun Devils football team, several professional football games have been played at this stadium as well. It has appeared in films such as "Jerry Maguire" and "Raising Arizona."
  • Vanderbilt Stadium, Vanderbilt University: With a capacity a little under 40,000, this stadium, home to the Commodores football team, is considered "intimate." President John F. Kennedy spoke at the stadium for the 90th convocation of the university in May of 1963.
  • Williams-Brice Stadium, University of South Carolina: Nicknamed "The Cockpit," this stadium is where the Gamecocks football team struts its stuff. When filled with fans, the east upper deck sways when fans jump up and down -- which led to the popular saying "If it ain't swayin', we ain't playin'."
  • Franklin Field, University of Pennsylvania: This hallowed stadium, where the Quakers football team and several other Penn sports teams play, was originally opened in 1895. President Franklin D. Roosevelt made his acceptance speech at the stadium after receiving the 1936 Democratic party's nomination.
  • Vaught-Hemingway Stadium at Hollingsworth Field, University of Mississippi: Fans chant the "Hotty Toddy" while the Rebels of Ole Miss football team take the field. The pre-game tailgating parties in The Grove are legendary and have been referred to as the "holy grail of tailgating."
  • Yale Bowl, Yale University: The Yale Bulldogs football team plays in this National Historic Landmark. When the neogothic-designed Bowl opened in 1914, it was the largest stadium built since the Roman Coliseum.
  • Navy - Marine Corps Memorial Stadium, U.S. Naval Academy: Dedicated to all Navy and Marine Corps servicemembers, past, present, and future, this stadium is home to the Navy Midshipmen football team. While the Army-Navy game is one of the biggest rivalry games in college football, it's never been played there.
  • Mountaineer Field at Milan Puskar Stadium, West Virginia University: After every victory in this stadium, the Mountaineers football team takes to the field to sing "Take Me Home, Country Roads." When the stadium was dedicated in 1980, John Denver showed up to sing the hit song.
  • Floyd Casey Stadium, Baylor University: Located about four miles from the Baylor campus, this stadium is home to the Baylor Bears football team. The University Board of Regents has recently started studying the feasibility of building an on-campus facility.
  • Bill Snyder Family Football Stadium, Kansas State University: Named for head coach Bill Snyder, this stadium is home to the Wildcats football team. Snyder ended his coaching tenure at Kansas in 2005, but was rehired in 2009, making him one of only three coaches in division I FBS history to coach in a stadium named after him.
  • Amon G. Carter Stadium, Texas Christian University: Fans of the Horned Frogs football team gather here to see their team play. Fans can look forward to a newly renovated stadium, which is currently under way, to the tune of $105 million.
  • Robertson Stadium, University of Houston: Home base of the Cougars football team, this stadium is also home to the university's women's soccer team and the city's major league soccer team, the Houston Dynamo. Ground will be broken for a new stadium in December 2012.
  • Reser Stadium, Oregon State University: The OSU Beavers call this stadium, named for graduates and benefactors Al and Pat Reser, home. The first game here was in 1953, and current capacity is 45,674.