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Will My Credits Transfer Out Of State? Experts Weigh In

Will my credits transfer out of state?By itself, choosing a college or university to attend can be a difficult decision. After actually attending a school for a period of time, many students may realize that they may have made the wrong choice. For these students, transferring schools becomes a great option. But say you relocate to a new region or state — will your credits, the ones that you've already worked so hard for, transfer along with you?

Regardless of the reasons why they're doing it, transferring schools is certainly a popular option for many college students. However, transferring colleges or universities should not be done without serious consideration, as credit transfers may not be guaranteed.


Transferring colleges or universities should not be done without serious consideration, as credit transfers may not be guaranteed.


According to a 2014 report published by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), students transferring schools for the first time lost an average of 13 credit hours. While nearly 33 percent of students experienced no credit loss, 39 percent of students had zero credits transfer from one institution to another, losing an average of 27 credit hours.

If you are considering transferring schools, particularly if you are looking to transfer those credits to an institution in another state where schools may run under completely different systems, credit loss should be something to keep in mind. In order to get more information about this issue, we spoke with two college transfer experts about their experience in the field, and here's what they had to say.

Q&A with experts on out-of-state credit transfers

Linda Sklander, Director of Admissions at Carroll University, Waukesha, WILinda Sklander, Director of Admissions, Carroll University, Waukesha, WI

How many of your transfer students are from out-of-state?

LS: Eighty-four students.

How is the transfer program at Carroll University different for out-of-state students?

LS: There is no difference in the application process for in-state vs. out-of-state applicants to the University.

Under what circumstances will out-of-state credits NOT transfer to your school?

LS: At Carroll University, credits are evaluated on a course-by-course basis. In some cases, a course may also be reviewed by the individual academic department for specific credit. There is nothing specific for out-of-state students and the way their credits are applied to a degree program at CU.

What are some common issues that students might face when transferring credits from out-of-state?

LS: A student from out-of-state may find it more difficult to visit the campus to determine if the campus is a good 'fit' for their academic and individual needs. I tell all students it is very important for them to visit the college or universities for which they have applied. An out-of-state student should also pay attention to location, majors offered and other college specific implications (like weather in Wisconsin). Know what to expect! It is imperative they find someone who will be a personal connection to help them with this transition.

Kathryn Reilly, Director of Main Campus Admissions at Post University, Waterbury, CTKathryn Reilly, Director of Main Campus Admissions at Post University, Waterbury, CT

How many of your transfer students are from out-of-state?

KR: As a pioneer in online and hybrid education, Post University continues to attract both traditional and non-traditional learners to its campus and online courses. Post's current incoming transfer population for fall 2015 is 53 total, with 16 coming from out-of-state.

How is the transfer program at Post University different for out-of-state students?

KR: Being that Post University is a for-profit school, there are no significant differences between the transfer process for out-of-state transfers vs. the transfer process for in-state students. Additionally, the admissions requirements, merit scholarship amounts, and credit evaluations are all based on the same criteria for both in-state and out-of-state transfer students.

Under what circumstances will out-of-state credits NOT transfer to your school?

KR: The evaluation of transfer credits, including both in-state and out-of-state, is a complicated and critical institutional function. At Post University, out-of-state credits that will not transfer are those that exceed the credit limit for two-year colleges and are not from an accredited two-year or four-year educational institution. Additionally, if a transfer student has a cumulative grade point average below a 2.0, their credits will not be transferred.

What are some common issues that students might face when transferring credits from out-of-state?

KR: Students must be sure that the courses they are transferring are college level and fit into their desired school's curriculum. Transfer students might face issues when their credits fail to match with their new school's electives or major courses. In addition to matching curriculums, transfer students must be sure that their grade point averages and final course grades are up to par with their new school's requirements. At Post, all grades below a C cannot be accepted unless the transfer student has earned an associate degree, at which point all passing grades may be considered. To better help students understand the process of transferring college credits, Post offers a free college credit evaluation to its current and potential, transfer students.

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If you're a student or prospective transfer student, check out more information like finding an online school or program, learning more about what to do with old college credits, and finding out how to choose the right major for the career you want.

Sources
1. Transferability of Postsecondary Credit Following Student Transfer or Coenrollment, Statistical Analysis Report, Nation Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education, http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2014/2014163.pdf