Investigation Career Training and Job Opportunities

Careers in Investigation
If you can think creatively, are interested in a career in law enforcement, and enjoy the idea of possibly being self-employed, you may want to consider career training in investigation. With the right education, you could become a private detective or investigator.

Investigators and private detectives may help lawyers, businesses, or private individuals to collect, analyze, and monitor information. They may also investigate computer crimes or provide assistance in both civil and criminal law cases. Depending on your field specialty, you could find yourself working as a computer forensic investigator, a corporate investigator, a legal investigator, or a financial investigator.

Career Training in Investigation
Various career training opportunities are available, such as online or college degrees. College degrees in criminal justice, accounting, computer science, and more could all lead to a career in investigation. In addition to career training, most states require investigators to be licensed as well.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, individuals in the investigation field should expect to see some job growth between 2006 and 2016. About 30 percent of investigators and private detectives are self-employed--good news if you have an entrepreneurial spirit. In 2008, investigators and private detectives earned a median annual salary of $41,760