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How to become a game designer

Infographic Thumbnail: How to Become a Game Designer

by Michelle Filippini | February 12, 2013



You’ve been called a “gamer” for as long as you can remember, so you might as well make a career out of it, right? Well, it might all sound like fun and games, but game design has evolved from the days of scribbling a great idea on the back of a napkin into an elaborate process involving a  specialists trained in a variety of disciplines who collaborate and sometimes work long hours to create great computer or video games replete with state-of-the-art animation and visual effects. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 59 percent of multimedia artists and animators, which includes computer and video game designers, are self-employed, often working from home but also in offices.

It goes without saying that it is helpful to possess artistic ability and talent, but people lacking in those areas may compensate with robust technical and computer skills, preferred by some employers. Likewise, those who do not have strong computer skills may make up for it through demonstrable artistic talent. The demand for more realistic video games continues to increase, but growth may be tempered by companies hiring lower-paid animators overseas, and by stiff competition as large numbers of game designers enter the field.

Individuals interested in pursuing this career may benefit from a solid blend of education, hands-on experience, and a combination of artistic and technical skills.

Learn more about working in the field of game design, i.e., what game designers do, how to become a game designer, college degrees required, career paths, and career outlook, in the following infographic.

Infographic: How to Become a Game Designer

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